Greco-Roman Columns

Posted By on July 14, 2009

This entry is part 5 of 6 in the series Ancient Rome

They are the current symbol of government, banking and finance, but did you know that there are 3 distinct styles of columns?

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The earliest and simplest of the columns are the Doric. They lack any decoration.

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Next are the Ionic columns,  more slender than the Doric with tops ending in a classic scroll.

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The Corinthian column stands apart with it’s decorative capital (top) usually carved with leaves and rosettes.

 

 

 

image The Italian Renaissance brought two other less-used columns, The Tuscan, which was very plain, unfluted and lacked adornments. And the image Composite Order which blended both the Ionic and the Corinthian styles.

 

 

 

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Comments

One Response to “Greco-Roman Columns”

  1. nikolaykotev says:

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